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A number of alarmingly high level hacks have revealed the fragility of cyber security in the IT age. These hacks left some of the world’s most powerful technology startup executives’ passwords compromised. Hackers stole the passwords and hacked Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Google’s Sundar Pichai and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey. All three of these individuals and their respective companies seem to be interconnected in this series of breaches.

Facebook and LinkedIn

It started in 2012 when hackers infiltrated the business-oriented social network LinkedIn. This lead to the compromise of well over 6 million accounts and more than 100 million passwords. Included in that list of passwords were those of none other than Mr. Mark Zuckerberg. As a result, both his Twitter and Pinterest pages have since been hacked.

LinkedIn claims to have since addressed and fixed the issue. But Mr. Zuckerberg reportedly re-used passwords from the past. That allowed hackers to infiltrate his accounts in 2016 due to the hack in 2012. Zuckerberg apparently used his Twitter account very rarely. In fact, he hadn’t Tweeted anything for four straight years. Nonetheless, that he failed to take necessary precautions left his account compromised. That can have serious repercussions, considering the amount of reach, influence, and power he has in the world.

Google

The same hacking group that broke into Zuckerberg’s accounts also stole Google’s Sundar Pichai’s password in June. The group goes by the name OurMine. This time the problem traces back to Bitly. Bitly is a URL shortening service. It’s advantageous for social media management because it saves space in channels that limit the allotted number of characters.

These are just a small portion of a growing number of influential celebrities and CEOs who fell victim to OurMine. They have revealed to the world that even some of the most technologically skilled individuals in the world are not immune from hackerism.

What To Do About It

However, it is important to bear in mind that in most instances, there is in fact a lapse in judgment. Mark Zuckerberg should have known to change his password after the LinkedIn hack. In any case, these are mistakes that anyone could make, especially when you’re too busy to concern yourself with tedious IT security. That’s why you hire pros to worry about that for you.

Delta Airlines halted all of its flights throughout the world yesterday due to a computer outage. Delta was forced to cancel many of those flights, leaving hundreds of people frustrated and stranded in airports on all sides of the planet. As of today, they reportedly lifted the worldwide halt. However, due to the enormity of the computer outage and the subsequent repercussions, passengers should still expect nearly all flights to continue to experience severe delays and in many cases total cancellation. This isn’t the first time this kind of incident has happened. But what causes it? And why can’t we learn from our mistakes? Why can’t we prevent it from happening again?

Too many moving parts:

Airlines tend to use extremely complex computer systems. In order to maintain a global network, companies tend to add new layers to the system. The more layers and moving parts there are to the system, the larger the margin for error becomes. This not only opens the doors to hackers, but also enhances the likelihood of internal human error. This, as seen in this most recent outage, can potentially cause a domino effect that impacts the entire company.

Dated equipment and shoddy maintenance:

Similarly to the previous issue, the size of the company makes it difficult to keep all parts fully up to date. Sometimes equipment is for forgotten. Here’s one case in which the phrase If it ain’t broke don’t fix it can get you into some trouble. Technology publication Wired reported that some parts of the airline’s system were up to 30 years old.

Inadequate Backup Plan:

What’s seems the most detrimental with regards to Delta in particular is the fact that all correspondence throughout the world, not just with air traffic control, but also with passengers and plane crews, could be traced back to one location in Atlanta. That means that when things don’t work in Atlanta, they don’t work anywhere. The result is a total shutdown everywhere.

Some of this is preventable. Some of it now. But if nothing else, there’s a lesson to be learned. iT maintenance and security is important to virtually all industries. And without maintenance, management, and security, chaos can ensue. If you work for a small business and you don’t want what happened to Delta to happen to you, find a managed IT services NYC company today.

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